Time For Coalition To Show Willing

The master of spin, Prime Minister John Key, has fired the first shots across the bow of the opposition parties. His quip to the media about “the coalition of the unwilling” will set the tone for the 2017 election and destroy the credibility of the opposition unless they move swiftly to prove him wrong and demonstrate that the wider left can work together. Continue reading

We Don’t Need Another Hero

The Labour Party leadership contest is hotting up. Far be it from the Alliance to give Labour advice on choosing leaders. However, the Centre/Left is coming off a crushing election defeat, and crushing election defeats are something the Alliance does know a thing or two about, unfortunately. We have been crushed by Left, Right, and Centre over the past decade.

We believe now is a golden opportunity to take stock and perhaps change direction. One thing that has emerged from the election is that the Centre/Left needs to work together, or at least work out ways to rub along – not try to run each other into the ground. Trying to get enough votes to govern alone is counter-productive. Continue reading

Put the Kettle On

The centre right won again. What’s new? The centre right have won every election since 2004 no matter what party is in power – give or take a bit of tinkering here and there. The post election analysis overheard from a couple of petrol station attendants the morning after probably makes the most sense of any put forward so far. “It doesn’t make any difference. They all say one thing and do another when they get in anyway.”

Barring outrageous gaffes, the New Zealand voter always gives a party three terms. Next election will likely see a change of faces in power. Whether that will translate to a change of direction for the country is entirely another matter. Continue reading

The Threshold for Democracy

Labour is right. It is an affront to democracy that some parties receive many more list votes than another party that has won an electorate seat, and yet get no MPs.

However, at the moment, winning – or being allowed to win – an electorate seat and taking advantage of the lower threshold for list votes is virtually the only way for minor or fledgling political parties to establish a presence in government. Requiring every party to cross the same party vote threshold even if it is lowered to 4%, as proposed in the Electoral Amendment Bill, will make it very difficult for minor parties to attract votes. Continue reading