We Voted For Change. Will We Get It?

It looks like voters will find out sooner rather than later whether they really did get the change of government they voted for.

The TPP partners minus the US are to meet in Japan in the next two weeks to try to revive the deal. Sadly, it appears the content is the same as it has always been, from investor state dispute settlement clauses to lengthened copyright and patent times which will bump up the price of medicine. It is still just a tool to allow corporations, many of which are, ironically, US based, to impose their rules on democratically elected governments to maximise corporate profits.

Prior to becoming the government, the Greens, Labour, and NZ First all spoke out against the TPP. They agreed trade deals need a major overhaul to ensure they work in the best interests of the people and the environment, not big corporations. Based on what was said, it should be safe to assume that New Zealand will not even consider aligning itself with the deal as it stands. Continue reading

We Don’t Need Another Hero

The Labour Party leadership contest is hotting up. Far be it from the Alliance to give Labour advice on choosing leaders. However, the Centre/Left is coming off a crushing election defeat, and crushing election defeats are something the Alliance does know a thing or two about, unfortunately. We have been crushed by Left, Right, and Centre over the past decade.

We believe now is a golden opportunity to take stock and perhaps change direction. One thing that has emerged from the election is that the Centre/Left needs to work together, or at least work out ways to rub along – not try to run each other into the ground. Trying to get enough votes to govern alone is counter-productive. Continue reading

Its Time To Bite The Bullet; If We Want National Superannuation, We Need Progressive Taxation

It seems like the Labour Party has fallen prey to the baby boomers’ panic over national superannuation with its announcement that it will raise the age of entitlement for superannuation to 67 years.

Baby boomers are now staring old age in the face, and with it loss of earnings from paid work, disability, and eventually the need to be taken care of – but by whom? Until the early 1980’s the top marginal tax rate was over 60%. It is now 33% and still the wealthy complain. Continue reading

Labour are welcome to borrow Alliance capital gains tax policy

The Alliance Party has congratulated the Labour Party on adopting its capital gains tax policy.
Alliance Party co-leader Kay Murray says Labour should have introduced the capital gains tax during its last term in office.
This may have helped make housing more affordable during the so-called housing boom during the last Labour Government.
Continue reading

National and Labour singing the same old economic song

The Alliance Party says National and Labour are squabbling over meaningless details of economic policy while the gap between wage rates in New Zealand and Australia grows larger.
Alliance Economic Development Spokesperson Quentin Findlay says the problem is that both parties are stuck with the same mindset.
Mr Findlay says it was a painful experience listening to National’s Gerry Brownie and Labour’s David Parker arguing this morning on Radio New Zealand and compared the debate that they had to two cats fighting in a locked laundry – producing a lot of noise but not much sense.
“Both National and Labour’s policies have been fixated on short term goals while ignoring long term goals that must be achieved by comprehensive planning.”
Mr Findlay says New Zealanders should be asking what we want our economy to deliver and how our economy should be run to deliver those goals.
He says both National and Labour are still stuck with free market ideology, but the problem with this approach was that the free market had a short term focus.
Further, what was in the best interests of the free market was often not in the best interests of the majority of people, Mr Findlay says.
“Over the past decades we have seen ongoing deregulation that is responsible for lowering wages and productivity in New Zealand.”
Mr Findlay says changes such as the rewriting of the Reserve Bank Act in 1989 to remove the goal of full employment, the introduction of employment laws which ended awards and comprehensive Union representation, and free trade agreements which forced jobs offshore to countries where people were forced to work for very low wages and in poor conditions.
“All of these policies have been implemented by either National or Labour.”
Mr Findlay says the Alliance promotes a long term comprehensive economic plan for New Zealand and economic reforms that benefited the majority of New Zealanders.
“The Alliance would place goals such as full employment and a high standard of living at the centre of New Zealand’s economic policy. To achieve those goals a comprehensive plan for economic development is required. This could be headed by an organization similar to the former New Zealand Planning Council.”
The Alliance would restore award rates and labour regulations which are common in other developed countries and implement a sensible system of tariffs and licensing designed to stimulate ‘fair trade’.
“Only through a planned and social economy can wage and salary rates be lifted to comparable levels to Australia and other Western nations,” Mr Findlay says.
ENDS
For more information contact Alliance Economic Development Spokesperson Quentin Findlay on 021 326 443

National and Labour singing the same old economic song
Alliance Party media release FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday 29 July 2010 The Alliance Party says National and Labour are squabbling over meaningless details of economic policy while the gap between wage rates in New Zealand and Australia grows larger. Alliance Economic Development Spokesperson Quentin Findlay says the problem is that both parties are stuck with the same mindset. Mr Findlay says it was a painful experience listening to National’s Gerry Brownie and Labour’s David Parker arguing this morning on Radio New Zealand and compared the debate that they had to two cats fighting in a locked laundry – producing a lot of noise but not much sense. “Both National and Labour’s policies have been fixated on short term goals while ignoring long term goals that must be achieved by comprehensive planning.” Mr Findlay says New Zealanders should be asking what we want our economy to deliver and how our economy should be run to deliver those goals.
He says both National and Labour are still stuck with free market ideology, but the problem with this approach was that the free market had a short term focus.
Further, what was in the best interests of the free market was often not in the best interests of the majority of people, Mr Findlay says. “Over the past decades we have seen ongoing deregulation that is responsible for lowering wages and productivity in New Zealand.” Mr Findlay says changes such as the rewriting of the Reserve Bank Act in 1989 to remove the goal of full employment, the introduction of employment laws which ended awards and comprehensive Union representation, and free trade agreements which forced jobs offshore to countries where people were forced to work for very low wages and in poor conditions. “All of these policies have been implemented by either National or Labour.” Mr Findlay says the Alliance promotes a long term comprehensive economic plan for New Zealand and economic reforms that benefited the majority of New Zealanders. “The Alliance would place goals such as full employment and a high standard of living at the centre of New Zealand’s economic policy. To achieve those goals a comprehensive plan for economic development is required. This could be headed by an organization similar to the former New Zealand Planning Council.” The Alliance would restore award rates and labour regulations which are common in other developed countries and implement a sensible system of tariffs and licensing designed to stimulate ‘fair trade’. “Only through a planned and social economy can wage and salary rates be lifted to comparable levels to Australia and other Western nations,” Mr Findlay says.
ENDS For more information contact Alliance Economic Development Spokesperson Quentin Findlay on 021 326 443